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TAROT by FRANÇOIS HERI 

Solothurn 1718, Switzerland

$64.00

limited edition of 3000 copies 

 

This fine Tarot was originally created in Solothurn Switzerland by master card Engraver François Heri in 1718 during the "golden century" of the Tarot in Europe.  This Edition is based on a copy preserved in the Swiss National Museum of Zurich.

 

Specs
  • Historic Reproduction realized by Yves Reynaud and Wilfried Houdouin of Tarot De Marseille Heritage
  • limited Edition of 3000 copies
  • 78 cards + 2 presentation cards (English and French)
  • Cards Measure  2 3/4  X 4 15/16
  • Tarot of Marseilles decks are not sealed in plastic.
Publishers
Tarot of Marseilles Heritage

 

 TarotArts is proud to represent Tarot of Marseilles Heritage in the United States.

 

Yves Reynaud and Wilfried Houdouin launched Tarot of Marseilles Heritage to protect and promote the heritage of the traditional Marseilles Tarot.  They publish limited edition facsimiles of the most beautiful historical Tarots of Marseilles, housed in the most prestigious intuitions and private collections around the world.  Meticulous detail is  applied including respecting the size and the design on backs of the cards.  Some of these Tarots originate in the city of Marseilles. Others come from regions around Marseilles where the the graphic and symbolic qualities of these tarots flourished for centuries.

 

Customer Reviews

Based on 1 review
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Glenn Francis
Heri 1718

Yves Renaud’s decks are always excellent value, high quality productions. This slightly larger, close facsimile originally created by Francois Heri in 1718, nearly but not exactly conforms to the basic pattern familiar from the Madenie, Chosson and Conver decks, et al. The carving is masterful, but perhaps not as refined as Madenie’s. Uniquely, the card’s subjects in this deck are fully revealed, on each side, without getting cut off by the frame. The stenciling is fairly rough, particularly the red areas. In many places it appears the stencil was slightly misaligned; or the ink was daubed on by hand in lieu of any stenciling at all. The odd-numbered sword cards are especially terrifying for this reason, as the blades are half-inked in opaque red, and highly suggestive of blood. Furthermore, 2 court cards display an entirely different shade of red, which suggests the possibliity that this deck was cobbled together from 2 or more disparate printings of Heri’s blocks. The Ace of Deniers (and the Ace de Bastons, less so) is a hot mess of smears, but L’ermite is truly beautiful, with a brown Franciscan-style habit; Arcana 13 is also refreshingly novel, a tan figure astride a field of well-articulated yellow, without the typical black ground. It’s impossible to view this deck without thinking about the early 18th century labor practices; this deck, so unlike our digital decks, was entirely hand-made, each iteration unique, likely stenciled or painted in part by children in studios lit by lantern or candle. It might be a challenge for some of us modern folk, so tainted by machine precision, to embrace this deck’s imperfections. But it also shows a return to a hand-made world, steps closer to Tarot’s origins, and closer to its craftspeople and artisans who carried Tarot forward.

Superb service from TarotArts, as usual.

Customer Reviews

Based on 1 review
100%
(1)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
G
Glenn Francis
Heri 1718

Yves Renaud’s decks are always excellent value, high quality productions. This slightly larger, close facsimile originally created by Francois Heri in 1718, nearly but not exactly conforms to the basic pattern familiar from the Madenie, Chosson and Conver decks, et al. The carving is masterful, but perhaps not as refined as Madenie’s. Uniquely, the card’s subjects in this deck are fully revealed, on each side, without getting cut off by the frame. The stenciling is fairly rough, particularly the red areas. In many places it appears the stencil was slightly misaligned; or the ink was daubed on by hand in lieu of any stenciling at all. The odd-numbered sword cards are especially terrifying for this reason, as the blades are half-inked in opaque red, and highly suggestive of blood. Furthermore, 2 court cards display an entirely different shade of red, which suggests the possibliity that this deck was cobbled together from 2 or more disparate printings of Heri’s blocks. The Ace of Deniers (and the Ace de Bastons, less so) is a hot mess of smears, but L’ermite is truly beautiful, with a brown Franciscan-style habit; Arcana 13 is also refreshingly novel, a tan figure astride a field of well-articulated yellow, without the typical black ground. It’s impossible to view this deck without thinking about the early 18th century labor practices; this deck, so unlike our digital decks, was entirely hand-made, each iteration unique, likely stenciled or painted in part by children in studios lit by lantern or candle. It might be a challenge for some of us modern folk, so tainted by machine precision, to embrace this deck’s imperfections. But it also shows a return to a hand-made world, steps closer to Tarot’s origins, and closer to its craftspeople and artisans who carried Tarot forward.

Superb service from TarotArts, as usual.