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Wiener Secession Tarot

The Wienere Secession Deck: available in a new Limited Edition Anima Antiqua series from Lo Scarabeo. Originally prodcued in 1906. The designs by Ditha Moser are characteristic of Jugenstil, the German equivalent of Art Nouveau with its preference for straight lines and simple forms in the shapes of squares, rectangles, circles and parallel lines. The trump cards depict toy wooden soldiers in a variety of events and impressions.

This edition features wonderful cardstock and packaging. The deck is a faithful reproduction of the 1906 WIENER SECESSION TAROT. Each deck is numbered in this limited edition. Numbered edition, limited to 2,999 copies 54 full colour cards & instructions


Specs

  • Product Type: Boxed Deck
  • Premium Cardstock
  • limited to 2,999 copies
  • Size: 2 x 5 x 1 IN
Artist


Ditha Moser was an Austrian graphic artist, who studied with Carl Otto Czeschka and Josef Hoffman at the Academy for Applied Arts in Vienna during the early 1900’s. She was also married to the famous Viennese designer Koloman Moser from 1905 to 1918 and was instrumental to his success as an artist, as she was responsible for providing funding to support one of his major professional accomplishments, the Wiener Werkstätte design workshop.

Ditha became known in 1906 for producing a set of tarot cards that were recognized as a triumph of graphic design. She began producing calendars illustrating biblical and mythological themes in the form of leporellos published in small editions as New Year’s gifts for friends between 1908 and 1913. The designs for these calendars are currently preserved at the Museum of Applied Arts in Vienna. As her output was limited, few examples of her work survive.

One has to wonder what her artistic output might have been had she not been limited by the lack of opportunities available to women at the time as well as by personal hardship, domestic responsibilities, and the advent of World War I, after which her artistic production ceased.

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